Terms Of The Munich Agreement 1938

The Czechoslovaks were appalled by the colonization of Munich. They were not invited to the conference and felt betrayed by the British and French governments. Many Czechs and Slovaks refer to the Munich Agreement as the Munich diktat (Czech: Mnichovský diktát; Slovak: Mníchovský diktát). the phrase “betrayal of Munich” (Czech: Mnichovská zrada); In Slovak: Mníchovská zrada) is also used because Czechoslovakia`s military alliance with France proved useless. This was also reflected in the fact that the French Government, in particular, considered that Czechoslovakia would be held responsible for a Resulting European war if the Czechoslovak Republic defended itself by force against German incursions. [59] In 1938, the Soviet Union was allied with France and Czechoslovakia. This could arm about half of the Wehrmacht. [93] Later, Czechoslovak weapons played an important role in the German conquest of Poland and France, the latter of which prompted Czechoslovakia to visit the Sudetenland in 1938. From 29 to 30 September 1938, an emergency meeting of the main European powers was held in Munich, excluding Czechoslovakia or the Soviet Union, an ally of France and Czechoslovakia. An agreement was quickly reached on Hitler`s terms. It was signed by the leaders of Germany, France, Britain and Italy.

Militarily, the Sudetenland was of strategic importance to Czechoslovakia, as most of its border defenses were there to protect against a German attack. The agreement between the four powers was signed in the context of an undeclared german-Czechoslovak war of low intensity, which had begun on September 17, 1938. . .